Implementation of Commissioning and Monitoring as it Concerns LEED v4

The fundamental and enhanced commissioning credits in LEED v4 are similar to the credits in LEED 2009; however, the new requirements are more stringent and three additional points are available.  In addition, there are two new energy metering credits in the Energy and Atmosphere (EA) category in LEED v4, one is a prerequisite. These energy metering credits replaced the measurement and verification credit in LEED 2009. The LEED v4 commissioning and the monitoring credits are as follows:

·        Fundamental Commissioning and Verification - Prerequisite

·        Building-Level Energy Metering - Prerequisite

·        Enhanced Commissioning - Up to 6 points

·        Advanced Energy Metering – 1 point

The new fundamental commissioning and verification prerequisite has similar requirements to the old fundamental commissioning prerequisite, the main difference is the new required commissioning plan has more specificity.

The new enhanced commissioning credit has two parts, Option 1: Enhanced systems commissioning, and Option 2: Envelope commissioning.  Option 1 has two paths, path 1 has similar requirements to the 2009 enhanced commissioning credit, and will earn 3 points.  Path 2 is a monitoring based commissioning credit, and offers one additional point for including monitored system use and performance in an on-going commissioning plan. Finally, Option 2: Envelope commissioning (per ASHRAE 0-2005) can be added to either path from Option 1 for two additional points.

The building-level commissioning prerequisite essentially requires a commitment to share energy consumption data of the LEED certified building with USGBC for five years or until the building changes ownership.  This is also a Minimum Program Requirement (MPR) for LEED v4, and is required of all LEED projects. Monthly utility bills can be used for the energy consumption data.

Advanced energy metering requires that all individual energy end uses that represent 10% or more of the total annual consumption of the building must have sub-meters that are permanently installed, record data at intervals of one hour or less, and transmit data to a LAN, BAS, or comparable communication infrastructure capable of storing all meter data for a minimum of 36 months.

Therefore, installing sub-meters with logging capabilities along with increasing commissioning scope could potentially earn two additional LEED points. The real benefit of installing a continuously-monitored sub-meter system is the additional insight of the building’s continued performance, and the capability to fine-tune building performance in a holistic manner.

- Megan Mentillo